Looking Towards the Future

We’ve come to the end of our time with you on this blog, and hope that over the course of the last few weeks we have presented some interesting arguments and ideas about homelessness in the United States. Obviously homelessness is something that’s much bigger than we are, and something that will take a lot of people, resources, and strength to eradicate. Some states are en route to reducing or totally eliminating homelessness, while others are still trying to figure out what to do and are passing laws that might not help the issue.

In the end, it’s going to take many more voices to bring light to homelessness and propose solutions. Economic downturn and bad situations have the ability to affect everyone, regardless of age or background. Of course, it’s not just us talking about the topic that matters–your voice matters as well. We hope that this blog opens a dialogue about homelessness that you can join, and make a difference in your area or for homeless individuals you know. Whether it’s volunteering at a soup kitchen or shelter, advocating for legislation to help the homeless, or working with individuals to find homes or treatment, every action counts. It’s up to us to do our part for our fellow citizens.

For more information, check out our posts and Twitter to learn a little about the state of homelessness today. The Los Angeles Times and the Huffington Post are also two great sources for learning more about homelessness, as they frequently publish stories about new occurrences and events. From an organizational standpoint, the National Alliance to End Homelessness has a lot of information and resources. Thank you for tuning in, and here’s to a better future for all.

Signing off,

Ben, Auris, Ryan, and Emily

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Fixing America’s homeless problem

The problems of homelessness has persisted for quite a while and has simply been an issue for way too long. Countless measures have been taken to eradicate a problem that isn’t merely bad for the individuals who are affected by it, but also for America and their reputation in dealing with social issues. Some would argue that the stance towards reputation is the issue because America simply doesn’t care about the opinions of other nations, but maybe it should. If America paid some attention to other countries and their handling of this issue, maybe then can they accommodate the half a million plus Americans who are living without a roof over their heads.

Finland is a great role model for the American government, as they have almost completely eradicated the homeless population in their country. In Finland, the government has taken care of its issue by ending homelessness rather than just managing it. This system requires some hope and trust and many will be quick to label it as a dangerous and ineffective system, but this is simply not true and the Finnish will prove it to you. Finland’s foundation of eradicating homelessness is its housing first model, which is as simple as is it gets: If people do not have a home the Finnish government will give them one. These homes are not like the many different transitionary housing accommodations we know in America such as shelters, but an everyday home. In America, generally, the belief is that someone needs to exhibit the ability to be stable and conducive to society in order to be awarded with such aid. In Finland, regardless of everything, anyone who needs a home will be supplied one and that other issues will be taken care of in the future. skeptical? Finland is the only country in Europe whose homeless population has decreased in the last year.Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.21.06 PM.png

Still skeptical? This is happening in America, right now! In case the American government can’t accept the success of a better, but other system, much like the Metric System, it just has to look at the state of Utah. In 2005, Utah’s Homeless Task Force looked at its homeless population and vowed to end chronic homelessness within the state, eleven years later they seem to be well on their way. A story aired on NPR on how Utah reduced its homeless population by 91%. The story follows Lloyd Pendelton, a man who described himself as a “conservative cowboy,” and who did not believe in “just” handing people a home to live in. Pendelton said he thought they should just get a job like everyone else and figure it out. Pendelton attended a conference in Chicago that changed his outlook on housing first programs forever. A homeless person costs the U.S. Government an annual 30-50 thousand dollars, a number which grows every year, yet housing them is less cost-effective? According to the Independent, permanent housing instead of managing the homeless saves 15,000 Euros, nearly 16,000 dollars annually. In fact, just about every study involved with housing first programs suggest that permanent housing programs are cheaper and more cost effective than temporary housing accommodations, the time and money for time in jail, and other necessary social services.

Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.25.43 PM.pngThe American government does not need to hurt its ego and look to Europe for help, in fact it can pride itself as one of their states seems to have found the solution. Housing first programs require a bit of hope, but there is a lot of sense involved. Giving people a place to live, will give them a place to clean themselves, to gather their thoughts, and to feel a sense of privacy again. Giving people a house will allow them to recuperate and afford opportunities meaning they will be able to contribute to society. Some may find it a little too “Socialist” of a policy, but the state of Utah has proven that this system works, just like Finland has. Excluding the ” assumed moral duty” the government has to properly care and accommodate for its citizens, giving the homeless a permanent place to live simply makes sense. The government seemed to have finally caught on, as they planned to be starting this kind of program next year with the hopes of ending chronic homelessness by 2020. It is to hope, that the new administration does not veer off of Obama’s plans because homelessness is fixable, so America, the ball is in your court, end homelessness, end it now! Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.14.58 PM.png

https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2016/sep/14/lessons-from-finland-helping-homeless-housing-model-homes

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/459100751/utah-reduced-chronic-homelessness-by-91-percent-heres-how

 

Bringing Beauty to Homelessness Pt. 2: Hygiene as a Right, Not a Luxury

Bringing awareness to homelessness is done in a variety of ways, and has become a global phenomenon. In keeping with my previous post about bringing beauty to homelessness, I want to focus on some trends that have been taking hold to make life more physically beautiful for homeless individuals.

A shave and a haircut can make a person feel great, but it also has the ability to change lives. From New York to Melbourne to London, to even Ogden, Utah, hairdressers have been volunteering their time to give haircuts to homeless individuals. Some go around neighborhoods, meeting individuals and documenting their changes in appearance on Instagram and other forms of social media. Others, like Mandie Barnes in Utah, open their salons and bring in other people to join the event. Barnes’ event, held in 2015, serviced over 100 people and provided them with food, clothing for the holidays, and more. Barnes and the other stylists note the added confidence and dignity the clients experience, as well as the positive impact the stylists experience in knowing they helped someone.

In addition to a haircut, others are helping homeless individuals feel better physically by providing them with places to get clean. Lava Mae, an organization started by Doniece Sandoval, repurposes old buses into mobile shower and hygiene stations for homeless individuals in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Sandoval began the project after hearing a homeless woman’s sadness about possibly never being clean again, and realizing how few public places there were for homeless people to shower. The buses dock in different spots around the cities, and provide homeless individuals with personal treatment and a place to get clean. A similar project is Dignity on Wheels, based out of Palo Alto, California, which also provides laundry services on repurposed buses. All of these innovative services make us think about how lucky we are to have access to water and a consistent place to get clean. Something as simple as a shower has the power to impact someone’s dignity and sense of self, pointing to the importance of something as simple as water and personal hygiene to our lives. Hygiene is a right, not a luxury, and it’s up to us to make a difference and make it possible for those without access to it every day.

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Bringing Beauty to Homelessness

Living on the street or in a shelter doesn’t carry a lot of glamour. An art director in Chicago, who chooses to remain anonymous, wanted to change this, and started the Urban Type Experiment. Each week, he introduced himself to a different homeless individual with a cardboard sign, and redesigned the sign using imagery and typography. He kept up with the individuals he helped and posted updates on his blog of his work and whether or not the signs had helped people raise more money or better their situation.

While the project is no longer active due to the art director moving out of Chicago, his blog and the stories on it are still available for viewing. His work was also featured in the Huffington Post and other news sites. Initiatives like the Urban Type Project are interesting ways to raise awareness, and try to make the day a little brighter for those who do not have a home. These project contribute beauty and creativity, thinking outside the box, and the standard cardboard sign.

Helping The Homeless Through The Power of Sportsmanship

Take a look at this incredible upcoming event organized by the Homeless World Cup organization. Earlier this year the same event occurred in Glascow where teams of the homeless from all around the world met to celebrate the sport they love. According to their website ” The last time a global survey was attempted – by the United Nations in 2005 – an estimated 100 million people were homeless worldwide. As many as 1.6 billion people lacked adequate housing (Habitat, 2015)”. In order to combat this the organization not only raises awareness about the condition of these unfortunate people but creates an environment where they can pull themselves out of the isolation of homelessness and re-engage with society. According to their website” … 94% of players consistently say that the Homeless World Cup has had a positive impact on their lives. The feeling of belonging, challenge of working in a team, regaining a health-oriented attitude towards life, self-esteem, experience of representing their country, and last but not least the experience of fun is a powerful combination to change a person’s life.” Regardless of whether you are a sports fan or not this organization and event is something which should be well worth all of our applause.

Utilizing The Strength Of The Crowd

Technology has an amazing ability to bring people together toward causes in ways unable to imagined. Although crowdfunding has in the past been used perhaps unjustly, it can also be used toward just and worthy goals as can be demonstrated in this story. To those who want to help them reach their goal You can find a link to the crowdfunding drive here. 

Best,

Ryan

Facts don’t lie, Mr. Mayor

Michael Bloomberg is one of the richest people in America, with a worth of forty-five billion dollars. After Rudy Giuliani left, Bloomberg had some tough shoes to fill, as Giuliani cleaned up a lot of crime and is considered iconic for his brave response after the World Trade Center was destroyed by terrorists on 9/11. Bloomberg’s tenure as a mayor lasted three terms indicating his success as the mayor of the Big Apple. However, the mayor received a lot of criticism for his dealings with New York City’s homeless people and its impoverished population. According to an article posted by the Wall Street Journal, back in 2013, right after he finished his last term, saw the former mayor defend his stance that he did not fail New York’s homeless population. The mayor in a way bats away the question and focussed on the well documented story of Dasani, an eleven-year-old girl who was living in a homeless shelter. The formerly tipped presidential candidate went on and said that he felt bad and would assure that her situation would be dealt with. Hers may have been, but what about the rest of NYC?

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Michael Bloomberg’s official website as mayor of New York City, repeatedly lauds him for his record of fixing poverty and helping the homeless, but this is a farce, as statistics have shown Bloomberg’s policies not only didn’t shorten the rates of the homeless they increased–by 62 percent. Looking at the statistics of his last two years as mayor both in 2012 and in 2013, New York city’s homeless population grew by almost 10,000 people, yet this man still claimed to have done a good job. In fact, when asked about his dealings of the homeless in New York City, Bloomberg stated, “I don’t think there is any administration in any city that has ever done as much to help those in need as we have done in this city” he later continued by comparing the issues of the homeless in New York City to that in other countries, but that is an idiotic argument. It does not matter what happens in other places, Michael Bloomberg is the mayor of New York and should have had everything at his disposal to make a change, but he only made things worse. Bloomberg will point to the 2007 Advantage Program, which helped afford the first two years of rent for people who moved from shelters to housing, but this was shut down four years later as Bloomberg tried to help the state of New York deal with its multibillion dollar deficit.screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-11-08-23-pmscreen-shot-2016-11-09-at-11-08-04-pm

Patrick Markee, a writer for the Coalition of the Homeless, lined up the facts one more time and explained what Bloomberg’s tenure left behind for the homeless and the poor: increase it’s population by 69%, one out of every three kids in NYC is raised in poverty, downplay the causes, and distort the truth about the rate of the homeless. Nowadays, three years later, the number of homeless population has gone up. This reinforces the notion that dealing with the homeless is a fragile and difficult issue to solve, but not fixing an issue and claiming you did something tremendous to fix it are two completely different things, yet Bloomberg’s website awards him for work. It could be said that Michael Bloomberg did a lot for the city of New York, but one is for sure he did not decrease the rate of poverty and surely didn’t help the poor, no website can disprove that–because facts don’t lie, Mr. Mayor.            bloomie

http://progress.mikebloomberg.com/

This is what L.A.’s homeless voters have to say about the presidential election

People registered to vote in Los Angeles will have a chance today to vote for a preposition which would authorize $1.2 billion in borrowing to accelerate the pace at which mostly nonprofit developers build permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless people.

Read more: LA Times

Best,

Auris

Why Long-Term Housing is the Solution

With all of the opinions about what the best way to deal with homelessness is, we can forget about victories that actually demonstrate ideas and policies that work. As reported by NPR and the Los Angeles Times, Utah has demonstrated itself to be a state that knows what works.

In 2005, Utah set out to end chronic homelessness. Kelly McEvers (NPR) notes that chronically homeless individuals are defined as “people who have been living on the streets for more than a year, or four times in the past three years, and who have a ‘disabling condition’ that might include serious mental illness, an addiction or a physical disability or illness.” The state began a housing program that implemented Housing First, which is a “homeless assistance approach  that prioritizes providing people experiencing homelessness with permanent housing as quickly as possible – and then providing voluntary supportive services as needed.” Housing First was first launched in 1988 in Los Angeles, California as a way to help homeless families find stable shelter. Individuals do not have to initially change or clean up to get housing, which can be common.

Utah had a number of factors that worked for it: a comparatively small chronically homeless population, support from the Church of Latter-Day Saints, politicians, and advocates, and agencies that worked together well and were familiar with chronically homeless individuals. Organizations supporting the housing method look at the individuals who qualify for housing and assess their need. In 10 years, Utah reduced its chronic homeless population from 2,000 to around 200. However, despite the progress, there is still not enough housing to cover everyone.

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Long-term housing solutions tend to be pushed aside in dialogues about homelessness in favor of shelters. Shelters can be a good emergency option, but not a long-term one. In a 2012 NPR segment, David Pirtle, a member of the Faces of Homelessness Speakers’ Bureau, outlines some of his memories about shelters from when he was homeless, including having his shoes stolen and encountering body lice. Pirtle also recalls how an individual in Washington, D.C. died in a hot shelter due to the facility not having any ventilation. Shelters might also have time limits and stay restrictions, which can make it hard for someone to stay for an extended period of time.

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Other long-term options include federal housing assistance and permanent supportive housing, which is specifically helpful for individuals with health problems, according to the Coalition for the Homeless. Long-term housing is also much more cost-effective. As mentioned in previous posts, homeless individuals can cost the state up to $50,000 a year between arrests, hospital visits, and more. Annual housing through the Housing First program in Utah is $11,00o per person. In addition to cutting costs, long-term housing programs reduce the number of people in shelters and have high success rates, with the majority of those in long-term housing remaining in the housing for months and even years. These housing options give people the change to improve their lives, cut out destructive personal habits, and better care for themselves and their environment.

Long-term solutions have been proven to work, and have produced numerous successes. While having multiple options for housing is a great idea, cities should further consider long-term housing for the benefit of both the homeless population and the city for the future. Through initiatives like Housing First, the chronically homeless have the chance to remake themselves and shed the burden of survival, all through the simple act of having a home to call their own.

Helping Others One Thread At a Time

Check out this heartwarming event that shows just how much effort and thought can be put towards helping those in need in unique ways. Massive donations and food drives are very important, but in this instance we can see that even the smallest of gifts can go a long way towards helping those in need.

Best,

Ryan