Fixing America’s homeless problem

The problems of homelessness has persisted for quite a while and has simply been an issue for way too long. Countless measures have been taken to eradicate a problem that isn’t merely bad for the individuals who are affected by it, but also for America and their reputation in dealing with social issues. Some would argue that the stance towards reputation is the issue because America simply doesn’t care about the opinions of other nations, but maybe it should. If America paid some attention to other countries and their handling of this issue, maybe then can they accommodate the half a million plus Americans who are living without a roof over their heads.

Finland is a great role model for the American government, as they have almost completely eradicated the homeless population in their country. In Finland, the government has taken care of its issue by ending homelessness rather than just managing it. This system requires some hope and trust and many will be quick to label it as a dangerous and ineffective system, but this is simply not true and the Finnish will prove it to you. Finland’s foundation of eradicating homelessness is its housing first model, which is as simple as is it gets: If people do not have a home the Finnish government will give them one. These homes are not like the many different transitionary housing accommodations we know in America such as shelters, but an everyday home. In America, generally, the belief is that someone needs to exhibit the ability to be stable and conducive to society in order to be awarded with such aid. In Finland, regardless of everything, anyone who needs a home will be supplied one and that other issues will be taken care of in the future. skeptical? Finland is the only country in Europe whose homeless population has decreased in the last year.Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.21.06 PM.png

Still skeptical? This is happening in America, right now! In case the American government can’t accept the success of a better, but other system, much like the Metric System, it just has to look at the state of Utah. In 2005, Utah’s Homeless Task Force looked at its homeless population and vowed to end chronic homelessness within the state, eleven years later they seem to be well on their way. A story aired on NPR on how Utah reduced its homeless population by 91%. The story follows Lloyd Pendelton, a man who described himself as a “conservative cowboy,” and who did not believe in “just” handing people a home to live in. Pendelton said he thought they should just get a job like everyone else and figure it out. Pendelton attended a conference in Chicago that changed his outlook on housing first programs forever. A homeless person costs the U.S. Government an annual 30-50 thousand dollars, a number which grows every year, yet housing them is less cost-effective? According to the Independent, permanent housing instead of managing the homeless saves 15,000 Euros, nearly 16,000 dollars annually. In fact, just about every study involved with housing first programs suggest that permanent housing programs are cheaper and more cost effective than temporary housing accommodations, the time and money for time in jail, and other necessary social services.

Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.25.43 PM.pngThe American government does not need to hurt its ego and look to Europe for help, in fact it can pride itself as one of their states seems to have found the solution. Housing first programs require a bit of hope, but there is a lot of sense involved. Giving people a place to live, will give them a place to clean themselves, to gather their thoughts, and to feel a sense of privacy again. Giving people a house will allow them to recuperate and afford opportunities meaning they will be able to contribute to society. Some may find it a little too “Socialist” of a policy, but the state of Utah has proven that this system works, just like Finland has. Excluding the ” assumed moral duty” the government has to properly care and accommodate for its citizens, giving the homeless a permanent place to live simply makes sense. The government seemed to have finally caught on, as they planned to be starting this kind of program next year with the hopes of ending chronic homelessness by 2020. It is to hope, that the new administration does not veer off of Obama’s plans because homelessness is fixable, so America, the ball is in your court, end homelessness, end it now! Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.14.58 PM.png

https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2016/sep/14/lessons-from-finland-helping-homeless-housing-model-homes

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/459100751/utah-reduced-chronic-homelessness-by-91-percent-heres-how

 

Facts don’t lie, Mr. Mayor

Michael Bloomberg is one of the richest people in America, with a worth of forty-five billion dollars. After Rudy Giuliani left, Bloomberg had some tough shoes to fill, as Giuliani cleaned up a lot of crime and is considered iconic for his brave response after the World Trade Center was destroyed by terrorists on 9/11. Bloomberg’s tenure as a mayor lasted three terms indicating his success as the mayor of the Big Apple. However, the mayor received a lot of criticism for his dealings with New York City’s homeless people and its impoverished population. According to an article posted by the Wall Street Journal, back in 2013, right after he finished his last term, saw the former mayor defend his stance that he did not fail New York’s homeless population. The mayor in a way bats away the question and focussed on the well documented story of Dasani, an eleven-year-old girl who was living in a homeless shelter. The formerly tipped presidential candidate went on and said that he felt bad and would assure that her situation would be dealt with. Hers may have been, but what about the rest of NYC?

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Michael Bloomberg’s official website as mayor of New York City, repeatedly lauds him for his record of fixing poverty and helping the homeless, but this is a farce, as statistics have shown Bloomberg’s policies not only didn’t shorten the rates of the homeless they increased–by 62 percent. Looking at the statistics of his last two years as mayor both in 2012 and in 2013, New York city’s homeless population grew by almost 10,000 people, yet this man still claimed to have done a good job. In fact, when asked about his dealings of the homeless in New York City, Bloomberg stated, “I don’t think there is any administration in any city that has ever done as much to help those in need as we have done in this city” he later continued by comparing the issues of the homeless in New York City to that in other countries, but that is an idiotic argument. It does not matter what happens in other places, Michael Bloomberg is the mayor of New York and should have had everything at his disposal to make a change, but he only made things worse. Bloomberg will point to the 2007 Advantage Program, which helped afford the first two years of rent for people who moved from shelters to housing, but this was shut down four years later as Bloomberg tried to help the state of New York deal with its multibillion dollar deficit.screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-11-08-23-pmscreen-shot-2016-11-09-at-11-08-04-pm

Patrick Markee, a writer for the Coalition of the Homeless, lined up the facts one more time and explained what Bloomberg’s tenure left behind for the homeless and the poor: increase it’s population by 69%, one out of every three kids in NYC is raised in poverty, downplay the causes, and distort the truth about the rate of the homeless. Nowadays, three years later, the number of homeless population has gone up. This reinforces the notion that dealing with the homeless is a fragile and difficult issue to solve, but not fixing an issue and claiming you did something tremendous to fix it are two completely different things, yet Bloomberg’s website awards him for work. It could be said that Michael Bloomberg did a lot for the city of New York, but one is for sure he did not decrease the rate of poverty and surely didn’t help the poor, no website can disprove that–because facts don’t lie, Mr. Mayor.            bloomie

http://progress.mikebloomberg.com/

The “right to be homeless”and its victims

While homelessness is a huge problem in America, some may not see it that way. Some people simply claim that they prefer the life of living on the street and not being stuck inside a home, this is a right, but their right to express it may come from a place of flawed judgement. Many homeless people have been without a home for many years, which makes adjusting to public housing projects tough for them, as they are so used to the life on the street.

Others may not be the right person to be making judgement calls on their state of living. Sure, everyone has the right to go where they want, but someone like Raquel Phillips, who has been living on the same interaction in Los Angeles for 15 years, may not be the right person to make that decision. People like Raquel have their judgement so impaired through all the wear and tear over the years that they are only a threat to themselves. There has got to be a drawn line on when people can exhibit their right to be homeless and when their mental state requires intervening, regardless if the person wants it or not. After all, as a society, we cannot let people rot away on the streets because they are too incapacitated to realize that they need help.

 

Why is D.C. inhabited by more homeless families than single adults?

Washington D.C., the nation’s capital, is home to one of the worst homeless crises in America. To make matters worse, for the first time, homeless families outnumber homeless individual adults. Entire families, mothers, fathers, little children are starving day in and day out and having a tough time to find shelter. This is alarming as the number of homeless families have soared by over thirty percent since last year, even though D.C.’s Mayor, Muriel Bowser, is actively trying to combat homelessness. All of this begs the question– Why are more and more families becoming homeless?

The answer to this question is Mayor Bowser’s biggest criticism. Yes, she has spent a substantial amount of money trying to combat homelessness and vows to increase this budget. Additionally, she has loosened regulations on homeless shelter requirements. All of these are important in combating homelessness, but critics of the Mayor blame the increase of homeless families on rising rates of real-estate, government and social failures, such as bad foster care, teenage pregnancy, and poor schooling.

The homeless deserve the same basic joys.

Homelessness is a problem in America, which you should know by now, after reading the other wonderful posts on this page. In a society that is driven by materialism, it can be hard for someone who has nothing to feel a sense of worth. However, human beings aren’t actually defined by what they have and own, but by who they are. It is important that we put an emphasis on these characteristics, as the homeless may not have a lot of clothes, food, or any of the other items many are privileged to have. Rather, we should listen to their stories and focus on their qualities because they are people too. It is important to see that in a world, where a lot of power is decided by this buying factor, that there are people who stand up for what is right and see people, all people, for what they are–after all, we all sometimes just need a good cup of coffee.

View story at Medium.com

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Blog Admins: Meet Ben

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Hi there! I’m Ben Huisman, and I am a Junior Communications major at the University of Maryland. I am interested in the growing use of social media within communications, the different platforms within social media, and their affect on real life scenarios in studying behavior. I hope that in the future I will be able to make a difference through the lessons I have learned and experience I have gained. I love sports such as basketball and football and follow them closely, but my big love is the game of soccer. Additionally, I love being with my friends and family and traveling the world. l  I was born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, a place where contact with homeless people is a rare sight. However, in many of the other cities I have called home over my life, such as Detroit, Las Vegas, Atlanta, and Jerusalem, homelessness, is almost an everyday sight. While I was saddened to see so many homeless people in those cities over the years, nothing surprised me as much to see how bad Washington D.C.’s homelessness issue is. I remembered saying to myself, “but it’s the capital of America?!?!” and this is what I hope to accomplish, to create a meaningful dialogue with the intention of making a change in the community in D.C.