Fixing America’s homeless problem

The problems of homelessness has persisted for quite a while and has simply been an issue for way too long. Countless measures have been taken to eradicate a problem that isn’t merely bad for the individuals who are affected by it, but also for America and their reputation in dealing with social issues. Some would argue that the stance towards reputation is the issue because America simply doesn’t care about the opinions of other nations, but maybe it should. If America paid some attention to other countries and their handling of this issue, maybe then can they accommodate the half a million plus Americans who are living without a roof over their heads.

Finland is a great role model for the American government, as they have almost completely eradicated the homeless population in their country. In Finland, the government has taken care of its issue by ending homelessness rather than just managing it. This system requires some hope and trust and many will be quick to label it as a dangerous and ineffective system, but this is simply not true and the Finnish will prove it to you. Finland’s foundation of eradicating homelessness is its housing first model, which is as simple as is it gets: If people do not have a home the Finnish government will give them one. These homes are not like the many different transitionary housing accommodations we know in America such as shelters, but an everyday home. In America, generally, the belief is that someone needs to exhibit the ability to be stable and conducive to society in order to be awarded with such aid. In Finland, regardless of everything, anyone who needs a home will be supplied one and that other issues will be taken care of in the future. skeptical? Finland is the only country in Europe whose homeless population has decreased in the last year.Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.21.06 PM.png

Still skeptical? This is happening in America, right now! In case the American government can’t accept the success of a better, but other system, much like the Metric System, it just has to look at the state of Utah. In 2005, Utah’s Homeless Task Force looked at its homeless population and vowed to end chronic homelessness within the state, eleven years later they seem to be well on their way. A story aired on NPR on how Utah reduced its homeless population by 91%. The story follows Lloyd Pendelton, a man who described himself as a “conservative cowboy,” and who did not believe in “just” handing people a home to live in. Pendelton said he thought they should just get a job like everyone else and figure it out. Pendelton attended a conference in Chicago that changed his outlook on housing first programs forever. A homeless person costs the U.S. Government an annual 30-50 thousand dollars, a number which grows every year, yet housing them is less cost-effective? According to the Independent, permanent housing instead of managing the homeless saves 15,000 Euros, nearly 16,000 dollars annually. In fact, just about every study involved with housing first programs suggest that permanent housing programs are cheaper and more cost effective than temporary housing accommodations, the time and money for time in jail, and other necessary social services.

Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.25.43 PM.pngThe American government does not need to hurt its ego and look to Europe for help, in fact it can pride itself as one of their states seems to have found the solution. Housing first programs require a bit of hope, but there is a lot of sense involved. Giving people a place to live, will give them a place to clean themselves, to gather their thoughts, and to feel a sense of privacy again. Giving people a house will allow them to recuperate and afford opportunities meaning they will be able to contribute to society. Some may find it a little too “Socialist” of a policy, but the state of Utah has proven that this system works, just like Finland has. Excluding the ” assumed moral duty” the government has to properly care and accommodate for its citizens, giving the homeless a permanent place to live simply makes sense. The government seemed to have finally caught on, as they planned to be starting this kind of program next year with the hopes of ending chronic homelessness by 2020. It is to hope, that the new administration does not veer off of Obama’s plans because homelessness is fixable, so America, the ball is in your court, end homelessness, end it now! Screen Shot 2016-11-20 at 7.14.58 PM.png

https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2016/sep/14/lessons-from-finland-helping-homeless-housing-model-homes

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/459100751/utah-reduced-chronic-homelessness-by-91-percent-heres-how

 

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